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The Fuzz Band

About the Band

Category: Band
Music Genre: 60's, 70's, 80's, 90's, Funk, Jazz, Motown, Pop, R&B, Reggae, RnB, Top 40, Tribute Band

In the music business, melodically based offenses are considered especially heinous. In Virginia, the dedicated musicians that investigate these vicious felonies are members of an elite squad known as The Fuzz Band. These are their stories…

The Fuzz Band, whose sound is a fusion of Urban & Rock music, met and formed while attending Hampton University. Originally created as the house band for Fuzzy Wednesday, Virginia’s longest running open mic, the band soon began collaborating on original music and developing their own sound. Performing first at local venues and colleges, the band soon released Without Boundaries, followed by Collision, Change, and a Change of the Guards. Several years, multiple albums, and three USO tours later, the band continues to shine.

Locally, the band has won multiple awards as Best R&B, Best Live Performer, and Best Song & Album recipients. Nationally, The Fuzz was featured in the Hollywood Issue of Black Enterprise Magazine, and has received nods in Rolling Stone and in Spin Magazine for their Chrysler Jeep Campaign. The Fuzz Band was also a featured headliner at the legendary Blue Note Jazz Club in New York City in 2013 and 2015.

The band has performed with Grammy award winning artists such as Alicia Keys, Lauryn Hill, Chicago, Jill Scott, Erykah Badu, Common and Outkast and has been commissioned to perform private parties for the NBA’s Allen Iverson, Hall of “Fame-r” Bruce Smith, and was flown to Amsterdam and NYC to perform holiday parties for fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger.

The Fuzz was also a featured performer at President Barack Obama’s inaugural ball. The band, which was the winner of the First Annual Capitol Jazz Festival in DC, went on to headline the 43rd Annual Hampton Jazz Festival with Frankie Beverly and Maze in 2010. The Fuzz Band has also become a regular staple on Foxwoods Casino’s entertainment roster as the New Year’s Eve headliner for two years; playing to
Crowds of over 5000 casino guests. Working on their 5th studio project as a full unit, and surviving the dreaded “curse” which tends to tear most bands to apart, the Fuzz Band continues to rock.

or call 757-460-9000

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Juneteenth (a portmanteau of June and nineteenth;[2] also known as Freedom Day,[3] Jubilee Day,[4] and Liberation Day[5]) is an unofficial American holiday and an official Texas state holiday, celebrated annually on the 19th of June in the United States to commemorate Union army general Gordon Granger announcing federal orders in the city of Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, proclaiming that all slaves in Texas were now free.[6] Although the Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed them almost two and a half years earlier and the American Civil War had largely ended with the defeat of the Confederate States in April, Texas was the most remote of the slave states, with a low presence of Union troops, so enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent.[6] A common misconception is that this day marks the end of slavery in the United States. Although this day marks the emancipation of all slaves in the Confederacy, the institution of slavery was still legal and existed in the Union border states after June 19, 1865.[7][8] Slavery in the United States did not officially end until the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery entirely in all of the U.S. states and territories.[9] Celebrations date to 1866, at first involving church-centered community gatherings in Texas. It spread across the South and became more commercialized in the 1920s and 1930s, often centering on a food festival. During the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, it was eclipsed by the struggle for postwar civil rights, but grew in popularity again in the 1970s with a focus on African American freedom and arts.[10] By the 21st century, Juneteenth was celebrated in most major cities across the United States. Activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in 49 of the 50 U.S. states. Modern observance is primarily in local celebrations. Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional songs such as "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and "Lift Every Voice and Sing", and reading of works by noted African-American writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Celebrations include rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties, historical reenactments, and Miss Juneteenth contests. The Mascogos, descendants of Black Seminoles, of Coahuila, Mexico, also celebrate Juneteenth. https://open.spotify.com/track/16EYuzAd8kRtJeWuSUCoHm?si=20VsfuKHTrq3RNH50jwMhA
BlackoutTuesday DON'T FORGET TO VOTE
We still here as soon as we come back we will be back. But until then please spread about the word THE FUZZ BAND and please feel free to listen to us on Pandora ,Spotify ,Tidal ,Sirius and all other digital platforms !!! We miss you all..
Loving this Prince concert 1985 on YouTube!!
Day 9 of Live performance pictures One of our last performances and first of this year Veer Magazine music awards We had fun doing a Queen Cover . Picture by Glenn Woodell
Day 8 of Live Performances THE FUZZ BAND Brooklyn. New York BKc - Brooklyn Circus Fashion event with @the great Jason Arce
Day 7 of Performance Photos we where nominated by The Deloreans 80's Band...This is THE FUZZ BAND Jacob Javits Center-International Auto Show for New York International Auto Show good times we nominate United Souls Band to do the same .
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Friday July 10th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

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Where????? So dying to hear you! 😎❤

Where will this be at!

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Tuesday July 7th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

R.I.P to one of Richmond's Kings
Josh 'Freeze' Reed
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Tuesday June 23rd, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

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Friday June 19th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

SONG FOR THE DAY SONG FOR THE TIME

open.spotify.com/track/16EYuzAd8kRtJeWuSUCoHm?si=20VsfuKHTrq3RNH50jwMhA
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Friday June 19th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

Juneteenth (a portmanteau of June and nineteenth;[2] also known as Freedom Day,[3] Jubilee Day,[4] and Liberation Day[5]) is an unofficial American holiday and an official Texas state holiday, celebrated annually on the 19th of June in the United States to commemorate Union army general Gordon Granger announcing federal orders in the city of Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, proclaiming that all slaves in Texas were now free.[6] Although the Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed them almost two and a half years earlier and the American Civil War had largely ended with the defeat of the Confederate States in April, Texas was the most remote of the slave states, with a low presence of Union troops, so enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent.[6]

A common misconception is that this day marks the end of slavery in the United States. Although this day marks the emancipation of all slaves in the Confederacy, the institution of slavery was still legal and existed in the Union border states after June 19, 1865.[7][8] Slavery in the United States did not officially end until the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery entirely in all of the U.S. states and territories.[9]

Celebrations date to 1866, at first involving church-centered community gatherings in Texas. It spread across the South and became more commercialized in the 1920s and 1930s, often centering on a food festival. During the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, it was eclipsed by the struggle for postwar civil rights, but grew in popularity again in the 1970s with a focus on African American freedom and arts.[10] By the 21st century, Juneteenth was celebrated in most major cities across the United States. Activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in 49 of the 50 U.S. states.

Modern observance is primarily in local celebrations. Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional songs such as "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and "Lift Every Voice and Sing", and reading of works by noted African-American writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Celebrations include rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties, historical reenactments, and Miss Juneteenth contests. The Mascogos, descendants of Black Seminoles, of Coahuila, Mexico, also celebrate Juneteenth.
open.spotify.com/track/16EYuzAd8kRtJeWuSUCoHm?si=20VsfuKHTrq3RNH50jwMhA
... See MoreSee Less

Juneteenth (a portmanteau of June and nineteenth;[2] also known as Freedom Day,[3] Jubilee Day,[4] and Liberation Day[5]) is an unofficial American holiday and an official Texas state holiday, celebrated annually on the 19th of June in the United States to commemorate Union army general Gordon Granger announcing federal orders in the city of Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, proclaiming that all slaves in Texas were now free.[6] Although the Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed them almost two and a half years earlier and the American Civil War had largely ended with the defeat of the Confederate States in April, Texas was the most remote of the slave states, with a low presence of Union troops, so enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent.[6] A common misconception is that this day marks the end of slavery in the United States. Although this day marks the emancipation of all slaves in the Confederacy, the institution of slavery was still legal and existed in the Union border states after June 19, 1865.[7][8] Slavery in the United States did not officially end until the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery entirely in all of the U.S. states and territories.[9] Celebrations date to 1866, at first involving church-centered community gatherings in Texas. It spread across the South and became more commercialized in the 1920s and 1930s, often centering on a food festival. During the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, it was eclipsed by the struggle for postwar civil rights, but grew in popularity again in the 1970s with a focus on African American freedom and arts.[10] By the 21st century, Juneteenth was celebrated in most major cities across the United States. Activists are campaigning for the United States Congress to recognize Juneteenth as a national holiday. Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in 49 of the 50 U.S. states. Modern observance is primarily in local celebrations. Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional songs such as Swing Low, Sweet Chariot and Lift Every Voice and Sing, and reading of works by noted African-American writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Celebrations include rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties, historical reenactments, and Miss Juneteenth contests. The Mascogos, descendants of Black Seminoles, of Coahuila, Mexico, also celebrate Juneteenth. https://open.spotify.com/track/16EYuzAd8kRtJeWuSUCoHm?si=20VsfuKHTrq3RNH50jwMhA

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THE FUZZ BAND Thank you!! ♥️

Sunday June 7th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

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Thursday June 4th, 2020

THE FUZZ BAND

Brought to you by the awesome people at Noir A Simply Panache Lounge.Our Stage Is Yours!!!

We’re Looking For Entertainers.

ACTORS • ARTISTS • BANDS
DJ’S• MUSICIANS • PLAYWRIGHTS

It is important that everyone interested have an active fan base and following with the ability to attract new and current members of Noir. Please include your marketing picture, social media handle and general information about your business. Please send details to :[email protected]

NOIR
A Simply Panache Lounge
Hampton Virginia
www.NoirHampton.com

Its Levels 🌊
Membership Options: www.noirhampton.com/membership
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Brought to you by the awesome people at Noir A Simply Panache Lounge.

Wednesday June 3rd, 2020

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Tuesday June 2nd, 2020

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Tuesday June 2nd, 2020

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BlackoutTuesday
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